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By The Foot and Ankle Group PC
August 07, 2018
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: neuropathy  

NeuropathyYou've experienced stabbing, shooting pain in your feet for months, and you notice tingling and numbness, too. Could this be neuropathy? Check with your primary care physician to see if you have diabetes or other autoimmune problem, and then contact the Foot and Ankle Group in Philadelphia for treatment of your neuropathy. Avoid the disability and lifestyle-limiting symptoms of this nerve condition. Your team of eight podiatrists are experts in diseases, conditions, and deformities of the foot and ankle, and they can help.

What is neuropathy?

It's an irritation and deterioration of the peripheral nerves associated with the feet and hands. With neuropathy, comes miscommunication with the central nervous system and intermittent to continuous symptoms of:

  • Pain
  • Burning
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Loss of movement and coordination
  • Loss of sensation leading to injury

Neuropathy frequently stems from serious health conditions such as:

  • Diabetes, and its characteristic blood sugar fluctuations
  • Arthritis and its associated joint breakdown and inflammation
  • Alcoholism
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Injury
  • Heredity (it can run in families)

Some cancer therapy medications also damage peripheral nerves, says the American Podiatric Medical Association. However, the APMA stresses that diabetes is the most common cause. Research shows that 60 to 70 percent of diabetics suffer from some degree of neuropathy.

If you have peripheral neuropathy...

See your podiatrist in Philadelphia or at one of the other three locations of the Foot and Ankle Group. Your foot doctor will review your medical history, symptoms, and medications. Plus, the doctor will inspect your feet, ask you to walk and note your range of motion.

Many people benefit from an individualized treatment plan to control their symptoms. Interventions may include:

  • Over-the-counter NSAIDS to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Prescription steroids to control inflammation
  • TENS treatments (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) performed in-office
  • Strict blood sugar control

People with diabetes benefit from the communication between the professional team at the Foot and Ankle Group and primary care physicians. Together with patients, they formulate ways to lower blood sugars to a healthy level, monitor feet for ulcer formation, encourage a program of regular exercise and more.

Learn more

Your podiatrists at the Foot and Ankle Group have a wealth of knowledge regarding the causes and treatments of peripheral neuropathy. Routine office visits are a must. To arrange yours, please contact one of our four locations in the Philadelphia area. We have early morning and evening hours for your convenience.

By The Foot and Ankle Group PC
June 11, 2018
Category: Foot Health
Tags: Diabetic Foot Care  

Find out how to prevent foot complications from happening to you.

Diabetic Foot Care

 

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes the first thing you want to do is work with your doctor to create a treatment plan that will keep your blood sugar in check. Making sure your blood sugar is within a healthy range is key to preventing health problems. Of course, one of the most commonly affected areas of the body when you have diabetes is your feet. Our Philadelphia, PA, podiatrists are here to tell you what you can do to prevent diabetic-related foot complications.

Examine Feet Daily

The only way you are going to know if there is a problem with your feet is if you are checking them out thoroughly every day to look for symptoms such as swelling, redness, tenderness to the touch, corns and calluses, cuts, open wounds and other problems that could easily turn more serious. Detecting these problems now and getting the proper care from our Philadelphia foot doctor could prevent serious complications from happening.

Stay Physically Active

One way to keep your blood sugar levels in check is to get up and moving; however, we understand that if you are new to a workout routine you may want to sit down and talk to us about how to start. Furthermore, you’ll want to make sure you have the right shoes and perhaps even custom orthotics to ensure that your feet don’t cause you problems as you begin your new workout regimen.

Keep Feet Clean

Your feet, just like the rest of you, need to be properly cleaned every day. When you get in the shower or the tub make sure you are using soap and water to clean every area of your feet, including between toes. This is a surefire way to get rid of bacteria responsible for infections such as athlete’s foot. Once you get out of the shower, make sure to completely and thoroughly dry off your feet.

Always Wear Shoes

Going barefoot is a bad idea when you have diabetes. This is because a lot of people with diabetes also have some degree of nerve damage in their feet and don’t know when they’ve stepped on something that could cause a foot injury. Wearing socks and shoes ensures that you keep your feet free from cuts, sores and wounds.

Trim Your Toenail

Long toenails can also increase your chances for ingrown toenails. To prevent this problem it’s important to keep your toenails trimmed regularly. Toenails should be trimmed straight across (never at an angle) and should be level with the tips of your toes. Toenails that are trimmed too low are also at risk for an ingrown toenail. Having trouble trimming your nails yourself? No problem; our podiatrist can do that for you!

The Foot & Ankle Group in Philadelphia, PA, and Mount Laurel, Bordentown, and Columbus, NJ, is dedicated to providing patients of all ages with the proper foot and ankle care they need. If you have diabetes you may have questions along the way about your foot care regimen. Turn to our expert podiatric team anytime.

By The Foot and Ankle Group
April 10, 2018
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: ankle sprains  

Find out if you could have a sprained ankle and what you can do about it.ankle sprain

Whether you were in a car accident or someone tackled you the wrong way during a game, there are many reasons people face ankle injuries. In fact, sports are a major culprit when it comes to both foot and ankle injuries. While our Philadelphia, PA, podiatrists hope that athletes are taking the necessary precautions to keep their feet and ankles protected, you should visit us if you think you have a sprained ankle.

Common symptoms of a sprained ankle include:

  • Swelling
  • Tenderness
  • Stiffness
  • Limited range of motion
  • Instability or weakness
  • A popping sound (at the time of injury)
  • Bruising
  • The inability to put weight on the ankle or walk

What causes a sprained ankle?

There are many reasons people deal with ankle sprains. In fact, fast, shifting movements such as the ones we see in soccer, basketball, or football can cause athletes to roll their ankles. When the ankle rolls the outside ligaments of the ankle can overstretch or even tear, resulting in a sprain.

Sprains can be mild to severe, depending on the extent of ligament damage. Since it’s impossible to tell how much damage has occurred to the ligaments of the ankle it’s important that you turn to our foot doctors in Philadelphia for a proper evaluation. We will also run imaging tests to determine the cause and the extent of the damage so we can create an effective and individualized treatment plan.

How is an ankle sprain treated?

Most ankle sprains can be managed through a conservative approach known as the RICE method. This stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. It’s important that you stay off the ankle and give it time to rest and heal. A podiatrist will be able to tell you when you can return to your normal activities.

To ease swelling and pain, ice the ankle for up to 20 minutes at a time 2 or 3 times a day, especially for the first three days after the injury. This can keep swelling down while also numbing the pain. Applying compression bandages to the ankle can also reduce swelling, as can elevating your foot above your heart whenever you are seated.

Certain pain relievers can help temporarily take the edge off when pain gets too intense. Your podiatrist might also recommend physical therapy or certain exercises to strengthen the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the ankle to prevent chronic instability. Only in severe cases is surgery recommended to repair the damaged ligament.

The Foot & Ankle Group is committed to providing its patients with comprehensive, quality foot care. We offer locations in Philadelphia, PA, and Mount Laurel, Bordentown, and Columbus, NJ, to serve you better. If you think you might be dealing with a sprained ankle, call one of our offices today.

By The Foot and Ankle Group PC
February 22, 2018
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: heel pain  

You shouldn't give up on finding a solution for your chronic, worsening heel pain. Help may be available from a podiatrist at The Foot and heel painAnkle Group, which has locations in Mount Laurel, Bordentown, and Columbus, NJ, as well as Philadelphia, PA. It's a practice staffed by a team of podiatrists who are dedicated to convenient, quality foot care.

When Heel Pain Becomes More Than an Annoyance

Everyone feels a little bit of heel pain every now and again, usually due to wearing a certain pair of shoes that may be a little too tight. But when the pain becomes more than just a minor annoyance, it is something you should talk to a foot doctor about. Heel pain can become a debilitating foot condition that affects your ability to work, move about, and participate in your favorite athletic activities. When heel pain continues to persist even when you’re not standing or walking, that is a particularly urgent sign that you need immediate treatment

Common Reasons for Heel Pain

One of the most common causes of heel pain is a condition called plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia ligament that runs underneath your foot, connecting the toes to the heel, becomes inflamed and damaged. It is often related to flat foot (also called fallen arches) and is common in runners. Overpronation is also a potential cause—it happens when too much pressure is put on the inner parts of your feet when you walk.

How Your Podiatrist Will Help

There are a number of ways that a podiatrist in Mount Laurel, Bordentown, Columbus, NJ and Philadelphia, PA, can help ease your heel pain. Here are some of the treatments you will explore:

  • Ice or heat therapy
  • Healing foot exercises
  • Customized orthotic inserts
  • Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatments (ESWT)
  • Heel surgery to remove spurs or repair damaged tissue

Get Help with Heel Pain

Heel pain doesn't have to be a permanent part of your life. Call The Foot and Ankle Group, with locations in Mount Laurel, Bordentown, Columbus, NJ as well as Philadelphia, PA, to talk about treatment options.

By The Foot and Ankle Group PC
December 15, 2017
Category: Foot Problems
Tags: Hammertoes  

Hammertoes are a common foot problem for people who spend a significant amount of time on their feet and who wear certain types of hammertoeshoes for long periods. Some people think that hammertoes are untreatable and that they’ll have to live with them forever, but that’s not always the case. A podiatrist at The Foot and Ankle Group in Philadelphia, PA and Mount Laurel, Bordentown, Columbus, NJ can help.

What Are Hammertoes?
Hammertoes happen when the toe bones begin to protrude unnaturally upward because of some kind of pressure or stress on the toes. The top of each toe may become swollen and red, making the problem even more pronounced. The tips of the toes point toward the floor and may sometimes hang over when you wear open-toed shoes. Normally, a patient can bend, lift and stretch the toes at will, but with hammertoes they may be stuck in the same position. It is an embarrassing foot problem that can also be painful.

Common Causes of Hammertoes
Hammertoes are most commonly caused by wearing shoes that put pressure on the toes. They may also be related to an arthritic condition. Some foot experts believe that hammertoes are hereditary—if your parents had problems with this foot condition you may be more prone to it yourself.

Treating Your Hammertoes
If your Philadelphia, PA or Mount Laurel, Bordentown, Columbus, NJ podiatrist diagnoses you with hammertoes, a number of treatment options will be explored. Here are some of the most common ways to deal with this troubling foot problem:

- Foot orthotic devices for support and to realign the toes.
- Toe exercises to strengthen toe muscles.
- Changes in shoes (orthopedic shoes may be recommended).
- NSAID medication to ease pain in the toe joints.
- Hammertoe surgery of the ligaments, tendons, and bones to straighten each toe. 

Call for Treatment
If your feet are in distress due to hammertoes, help is available from a podiatrist at The Foot and Ankle Group in Philadelphia, PA and Mount Laurel, Bordentown, Columbus, NJ. Call the office today to schedule time for a foot exam and consultation.





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